El Toro Brisket

Salt and Pepper are amazing on brisket, but every once in a while you want to impart some additional flavors, for me that means adding additional texture and heat. That is exactly what I did with the El Toro Brisket. Adding, fresh coffee grounds, heat from dehydrated habaneros adds a level of flavor that when mixed with smoke is truly memorable! Let’s get into the cook!

El Toro Brisket

Ingredients:
Coarse Black Pepper 1/2 Cup
Coarse Salt 1/4 Cup
Fine Ground Espresso Coffee 1/4 Cup Habanero Powder 1/4 Cup
Chili Lime Powder 1/4 Cup
Dijon Mustard

El Toro Brisket

The Prep:

Trim brisket to desired fat ratio level.
Here a tip, once the brisket is cooked its hard to tell which direction the grain is going. Turn the brisket over so the fat side faces down, follow the direction of the muscle structure and cut a small portion of the brisket off in that same direction. Then when the cook is complete you can identify which way to slice and serve.

Using dijon mustard evenly coat brisket making sure to get all sides and edges. The mustard will act as the binder to help the dry rub adhere firmly when applied.

In a medium size mixing bowl, or shaker bottle add all dry ingredients and shake/mix thoroughly. This makes sure the salt and other spices gets distributed evenly and no salt pockets are formed.

Generously season and coat the brisket with the rub mixture. Brisket is a heavy cut of meat so do not be shy with the rub. Make sure to get the edges as well. Season until the yellow of the mustard is covered completely, then let meat rest for roughly 20 minutes.

As the brisket is resting make sure your smoker is set running at roughly 255, it’s important to stay within a +/- 5 degree range during this cook.

The Cook:

El Toro Brisket

Set brisket on smoker and monitor cooking temperatures internally. Always cook to USDA safety standards for beef. Now with brisket the temperature to pull from smoker changes depending on the size and feel. I suggest cooking by probe once you have reached the USDA safety internal temperature. Most pull their brisket at 199 or 202 degrees.

Once brisket as reached desired internal temperature, wrap in a small towel and place in a cooler to rest. The longer it can rest the better, 3-5 hours is perfectly fine and you brisket will still be warm enough to slice and serve.

When serving, make sure to slice against the grain for a better eating experience.

The El Toro Brisket is best served in a Pitmaster Taco, which consists of a slice of white bread, thick slice of brisket, topped with pickled red and white onion, enjoy!

El Toro Brisket

Ingredients:
Coarse Black Pepper 1/2 Cup
Coarse Salt 1/4 Cup
Fine Ground Espresso Coffee 1/4 Cup Habanero Powder 1/4 Cup
Chili Lime Powder 1/4 Cup
Dijon Mustard

El Toro Brisket



The Prep:


Trim brisket to desired fat ratio level.


Here a tip, once the brisket is cooked its hard to tell which direction the grain is going. Turn the brisket over so the fat side faces down, follow the direction of the muscle structure and cut a small portion of the brisket off in that same direction. Then when the cook is complete you can identify which way to slice and serve.

Using dijon mustard evenly coat brisket making sure to get all sides and edges. The mustard will act as the binder to help the dry rub adhere firmly when applied.


In a medium size mixing bowl, or shaker bottle add all dry ingredients and shake/mix thoroughly. This makes sure the salt and other spices gets distributed evenly and no salt pockets are formed.


Generously season and coat the brisket with the rub mixture. Brisket is a heavy cut of meat so do not be shy with the rub. Make sure to get the edges as well. Season until the yellow of the mustard is covered completely, then let meat rest for roughly 20 minutes.


As the brisket is resting make sure your smoker is set running at roughly 255, it’s important to stay within a +/- 5 degree range during this cook.


The Cook:


El Toro Brisket

Set brisket on smoker and monitor cooking temperatures internally. Always cook to USDA safety standards for beef. Now with brisket the temperature to pull from smoker changes depending on the size and feel. I suggest cooking by probe once you have reached the USDA safety internal temperature. Most pull their brisket at 199 or 202 degrees.


Once brisket as reached desired internal temperature, wrap in a small towel and place in a cooler to rest. The longer it can rest the better, 3-5 hours is perfectly fine and you brisket will still be warm enough to slice and serve.

When serving, make sure to slice against the grain for a better eating experience.


The El Toro Brisket is best served in a Pitmaster Taco, which consists of a slice of white bread, thick slice of brisket, topped with pickled red and white onion, enjoy!

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